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Hubble Telescope: Hubble Telescope sees explosion of a star 530 times the size of the Sun, going back 11 billion years

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Neutron Star Explosion: The universe was in its infancy. 11 billion years ago a giant star exploded. Now the telescope has gone back 11 billion years to capture the moment when the massive star exploded, or went supernova. This star was 530 times bigger than our Sun.

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Star Explosion: NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope created a unique example. Space telescopes have captured various moments of distant supernovae. The universe was then in its infancy. 11 billion years ago a giant star exploded. Now the telescope has gone back 11 billion years to capture the moment when the massive star exploded, or went supernova. This star was 530 times bigger than our Sun. A cataclysmic explosion blew the outer layers of gas into the surrounding universe. This phenomenon is called supernova. Astronomers used powerful space observatories to image the scattered state of the exploding star.

“A supernova can be detected at a very early stage. Because that stage is really short. It only lasts from a few hours to a few days, and it’s very difficult to detect a supernova. In the same exposure we take a sequence of images.” We were able to see—like the many faces of a supernova,” explains Wenley Chen, the paper’s first author.

The images were discovered in a 2010 review of Hubble observational archive data, according to Wenlei Chen, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Minnesota and lead author of the study published in the journal Nature. This is the first time in the history of the universe that astronomers have been able to see a supernova in detail.

NASA says these images and related research could help scientists learn more about the formation of stars and galaxies in the early universe. Such collapsing stars are called ‘red supergiants’. They lived in ‘dwarf galaxies’ and exploded at the end of their relatively short lifetimes.

“The supernova is expanding and cooling,” says Patrick Kelly, a professor of astronomy at the University of Minnesota and a co-author of the study. So its color changes from warm blue to cool red.”

Meanwhile, red supergiants are brighter, more massive and massive stars, Chen said. However, they are much cooler than other massive stars. That’s why they are red. A red supergiant would collapse after exhausting the fusion energy in its core and destroy the outer layers of the star after the explosion.

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The Hubble exposure also captured rapid changes in the color of the fading supernova, indicating a change in temperature. The hotter the supernova, the bluer it is. The first stage of the image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope also appears blue. As the supernova cooled, its light turned red. The research team was also able to measure the size of a dying star in the early universe.

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