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Artemis 1: Orion is set to break Apollo 13’s 52-year record of failed moon landings

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Orion spacecraft breaks Apollo 13 record: What is it? The spacecraft travels 4,32,192 km from the planet. This is the farthest distance ever traveled by a spacecraft designed for humans, previously achieved by Apollo 13.

The Orion spacecraft is on track to break Apollo 13’s 52-year record.

Orion spacecraft: Ten days ago, the Orion spacecraft flew to the moon from Cape Canaveral, Florida. That Orion is about to write his name in the pages of history. Orion is about to break the record set by Apollo 13. what is that record? The spacecraft travels 4,32,192 km from the planet. This is the farthest distance ever traveled by a spacecraft designed for humans, previously achieved by Apollo 13.

The previous record was set by the Apollo 13 spacecraft, the seventh crewed mission of the Apollo Space Program and the third to land on the moon. However, the landing was aborted when the service module’s oxygen tank failed two days into his mission. The spacecraft traveled her 4,00,171 km from Earth. Because NASA was able to safely bring back three astronauts from a dead spacecraft.

Orion is now on day 9 of the mission. He’s just one day away from the rover setting a new record. The Orion spacecraft will enter a retrograde orbit at a considerable distance around the Moon. Because it keeps cruising at 4,200km/h. The 25-day mission aims to explore all possible systems for sending humans to the moon.

The new orbit is very far away. Because it is about 80,467 km above the surface of the Moon. “The orbit is so large that it would take him six days for the spacecraft to make a half-revolution around the moon before it deorbits and returns to Earth,” he said in an official NASA blog post.

Meanwhile, flight controllers are conducting the third of a series of planned Star Tracker development flight tests, with the fourth scheduled for November 26. A “star tracker is a navigation tool” that measures the positions of stars to help spacecraft determine their orientation. During his first three days in flight, engineers evaluated preliminary data to understand star tracker readings related to thruster launches, the U.S. Space Agency wrote in a blog post.

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Overnight engineers begin round-the-clock testing of the Reactive Control Systems engine to assess engine performance for standard and non-standard thruster configurations. This test procedure provides data and confirms that the reaction control thrusters can control Orion’s orientation in alternative configurations if there are problems with the initial configuration.

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